Five Modernism Painter Who Discovered Theirs Idea in Japanese Art

  1. Vincent Van Gogh

While in Paris, Van Gogh was exposed to a myriad of artistic styles, including the Japanese woodblock print, or “ukiyo-e.” These prints were only made available in the West in the mid-nineteenth century. Van Gogh collected works by Japanese ukiyo-e masters like Hiroshige and Hokusai and claimed these works were as important as works by European artists, like Rubens and Rembrandt. Van Gogh was inspired to create this particular painting by a reproduction of a print by Keisai Eisen that appeared on the May 1886 cover of the magazine Paris Illustré. Van Gogh enlarges Eisen’s image of the courtesan, placing her in a contrasting, golden background bordered by a lush water garden based on the landscapes of other prints he owned.

2. Henry Matisse

Matisse was heavily influenced by art from other cultures. Having seen several exhibitions of Asian art, and having traveled to North Africa, he incorporated some of the decorative qualities of Islamic art, the angularity of African sculpture, and the flatness of Japanese prints into his own style.

 

 

 

 

3. Franz Kline

Franz Kline is most famous for his black and white abstractions, which have been likened variously to New York’s cityscape, the landscape of his childhood home in rural Pennsylvania, and Japanese calligraphy

4. Mary Cassat

Cassatt’s work combined the light color palette and loose brushwork of Impressionism with compositions influenced by Japanese art as well as by European Old Masters, and she worked in a variety of media throughout her career. This versatility helped to establish her professional success at a time when very few women were regarded as serious artists.

    

 

5. Edgar Degas

Like many of the Impressionists, Degas was significantly influenced by Japanese prints, which suggested novel approaches to composition. The prints had bold linear designs and a sense of flatness that was very different from the traditional Western picture with its perspective view of the world.