×
Holy Hops! These Priests Managed To Resurrect A 220-Year-Old Beer Recipe!

Holy Hops! These Priests Managed To Resurrect A 220-Year-Old Beer Recipe!

This particular beer and the method for its brewing was thought to be lost in 1798 after the Norbertine Monastery was burned down by French revolutionaries.

Beer is said to be the world's oldest drink, and it possibly dates back to the Neolithic era or even further back to 9500 BC. We've been drinking this frothy, amber drink for a very, VERY long time! It currently stands as the third-most popular drink preferred by people all over the world, after water and tea. 

Source: Pixabay

Ale is such a popular drink that there's an entire order of priests that brews beer. The Trappist order started brewing beer because they primarily grew or traded their food, and they made their own drinks as well. They actually brewed beer because it sanitized water, adding important nutrients into the beverage. 

Joseph Haier- Monks in a cellar (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

These priests are so passionate about their beer-brewing that they managed to resurrect a recipe that was initially thought to be lost. The Grimbergen Abbey in Belgium has started brewing beer again after they rediscovered a 220-year-old recipe that the monks used after perusing their archives for the original ingredients and the brewing methods. 



 

The exciting news is pretty significant for beer-loving Belgians. The Grimbergen Abbey is said to have produced a fabled medieval beer whose recipe was adopted by other mass producers in the 1950s. Grimbergen Abbey's subprior Father Karel Stautemas uncasked the first glass in the presence of the town's mayor as well as 120 journalists and beer enthusiasts who had come to show their enthusiastic support for the suds. 



 



 

 



 

Father Stautemas spoke about the significance of the beer, as it was the culmination of four years of research done. This particular beer and the method for its brewing was thought to be lost in 1798 after the Norbertine Monastery was burned down by French revolutionaries. Even though the monastery was later reinstated, the recipes were thought to be lost for good. 



 

But this beer is not for the faint-hearted. Using most of the old brewing methods, the newly-established microbrewery is churning out a beer that has a 10.8% alcohol by volume. So it wouldn't be wise to down the Weiss in large volumes. Currently, the beer is being brewed in partnership with another major beer brand, but have no intentions of taking their drink to an international level. 



 

Recommended for you