Very Unique Salt Installation Artworks by Motoi Yamamoto

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Very Unique Salt Installation Artworks by Motoi Yamamoto

Yamamoto made the stairs and even decorated the museum floor with his super unique ornaments with salt.

Apparently not only as a spice in cooking, but salt can also produce extraordinary works of art.

Like this artist, Motoi Yamamoto Born in 1966 in Hiroshima, Japan, artist and sculptor who is able to make three-dimensional installation works, such as sculptures and other unique objects using salt.

In an exhibition at the Hakone Museum in Kanagawa, Japan, Yamamoto showed his very unique and beautiful work. Yamamoto made the stairs and even decorated the museum floor with his super unique ornaments with salt. Visitors to the exhibition also looked amazed by Yamamoto's work. This complicated labyrinth which made it only by using table salt, as well as other works.

There is a sad and tragic story that inspired Yamamoto in creating his artwork. Yamamoto's sister passed away at the age of 24 due to brain cancer. Yamamoto, who was studying at Kanazawa College of Art, decided to build a work of salt to dispel his sadness and respect for his sister.

In death rituals in Japan, salt is often given to everyone who comes to the funeral procession. Salt is also often referred to as an exorcist in Japan.

At the end of the exhibition, Yamamoto always requested that the salts that he had used be returned to the sea so that the salt would be adventurous.

Check out the stunning artworks below!

1.

Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

In addition to making labyrinths and intricate patterns like this, Motoi also makes installations of stairs, walls, etc. that are also made of salt. Not only that, drawings, paintings, and sculptures are also included in the list of Motoi's works. For each of these works, Motoi can spend up to hundreds of hours of work. After each performance, these salts will be collected and thrown back into the sea. It seems that Motoi is indeed obsessed with complicated patterns like this. This is evident from his other works, such as paintings.

2.

Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

"Drawing a labyrinth with salt is the same as tracing my memories. Memories will continue to change and disappear with time. However, what I want to find is a path where I can remember the most beautiful memories in my life that cannot be achieved just by drawing or write, "Yamamoto said.

3.

Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

4.

Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

The patterns are meant to convey a sense of eternity. Yamamoto makes them by sprinkling salt on the floor with a plastic bottle used for machine oil. He starts at the back of an exhibit and slowly works his way forward, so as to avoid stepping on his creations. Some installations, like Yamamoto's current exhibition at the Fondation Espace Ecureuil in France, use upwards of 2,000 pounds of salt. That particular piece took over fifty hours to construct.

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Makoto Morimura)

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Stefan Worring/Motoi Yamamoto)

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Stefan Worring/Motoi Yamamoto)

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Image credits: MOTOI YAMAMOTO (photograph by Stefan Worring/Motoi Yamamoto)

Source: twistedsifter

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